Following excerpts from the leading book on neuroscience for consciousness titled "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts" by Stanislas Dehaene show how today's neuroscience confirms DOS model's account of consciousness (with permission from the author).

Explaining the filtration process:

"Out of countless potential thoughts, what reaches our conscious mind is la crème de la crème, the outcome of the very complex sieve that we call attention. Our brain ruthlessly discards the irrelevant information and ultimately isolates a single conscious object, based on its salience or its relevance to our current goals. This stimulus then becomes amplified and able to orient our behavior."

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 24

Explaining how unconscious operations progresses towards decision making:

"My picture of consciousness implies a natural division of labor. In the basement, an army of unconscious workers does the exhausting work, sifting through piles of data. Meanwhile, at the top, a select board of executives, examining only a brief of the situation, slowly makes conscious decisions."

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 79

"A great variety of cognitive operations, from perception to language understanding, decision, action, evaluation, and inhibition can unfold, at least partially, in a subliminal mode. Below the conscious stage, myriad unconscious processors, operating in parallel, constantly strive to extract the most detailed and complete interpretation of our environment. They operate as nearly optimal statisticians who exploit every slightest perceptual hint —a faint movement, a shadow, a splotch of light—to calculate the probability that a given property holds true in the outside world. Much as the weather bureau combines dozens of meteorological observations to infer the chance of rain in the next few days, our unconscious perception uses incoming sense data to compute the probability that colors, shapes, animals, or people are present in our surroundings. Our consciousness, on the other hand, offers us only a glimpse of this probabilistic universe—what statisticians call a "sample" from this unconscious distribution. It cuts through all ambiguities and achieves a simplified view, a summary of the best current interpretation of the world, which can then be passed on to our decision-making system.

This division of labor, between an army of unconscious statisticians and a single conscious decision maker, may impose itself on any moving organism by that organism's very necessity of acting upon the world. No one can act on mere probabilities—at some point, a dictatorial process is needed to collapse all uncertainties and decide. Alea jacta est: "the die is cast," as Caesar famously said after crossing the Rubicon to seize Rome from the hands of Pompey. Any voluntary action requires tipping the scales to a point of no return. Consciousness may be the brain's scale-tipping device— collapsing all unconscious probabilities into a single conscious sample, so that we can move on to further decisions."

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 79

Explaining LB Summary:

"In order to be useful, the brain's conscious brief must be stable and integrative. During a nationwide crisis, it would be pointless for the FBI to send the president thousands of successive messages, each holding a little bit of truth, and let him figure it out for himself. Similarly, the brain cannot stick to a low-level flux of incoming data: it must assemble the pieces into a coherent story. Like a presidential brief, the brain's conscious summary must contain an interpretation of the environment written in a "language of thought" that is abstract enough to interface with the mechanisms of intention and decision making."

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 86

(Quote) Explaining role of B-ROM, which utilizes past information for future use:

"Consciousness is then, as it were, the hyphen which joins what has been to what will be, the bridge which spans the past and the future.

— Henri Bergson, Huxley Memorial Lecture (1911)"

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 86

Explains parallel and serial processing of LB and VP respectively:

This seems to be a major function of consciousness: to collect the information from various processors, synthesize it, and then broadcast the result—a conscious symbol—to other, arbitrarily selected processors. These processors, in turn, apply their unconscious skills to this symbol, and the entire cycle may repeat a number of times. The outcome is a hybrid serial-parallel machine, in which stages of massively parallel computation are interleaved with a serial stage of conscious decision making and information routing.

Stanislas Dehaene. 2014. "Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts", page 89